The Power of Peer Observation

Sometimes the best way teachers can learn and improve is by observing each other.  So why aren’t we doing it more often?

When someone enters a classroom for an observation, even the most veteran teachers can get nervous.  No one wants to feel scrutinized or appear less than at our best, especially in front of our colleagues.  To ameliorate this reluctance towards peer observation, the first step is to make the practice commonplace.  We must foster a community of open-doors and low-risk observation to truly create a positive and productive learning experience for both observer and observee.  (The bonus of this practice is that it makes those higher-stakes evaluative observations seem a little less nerve-wracking too!)

To begin this transformation, try recruiting a few teachers who are willing to invite others into their classroom hold “open houses” where other teachers can come and observe.  Hold professional development sessions to create observation protocols so that teachers know what to expect, look for, and reflect upon throughout the observation process.  Teachers can take the first steps by asking trusted peers to observe specific lessons for certain objectives – classroom management, student engagement, learning group dynamics, etc.

Does your school foster peer observations?  What can you do to help create this within your school community?